Groups Similar Search Look up By Text Browse About

Facebook’s Portal video chat devices launch today


Facebooks home video chat devices, the Portal and Portal Plus, are going on sale today, a month after they were initially announced. The products are almost exclusively focused on video chatting. While they also display photos, play music, and support a small number of video networks, their feature set is very limited at launch — you cant even browse Facebook on them. Youre primarily meant to use them to chat with people over Facebook Messenger, and Facebook has built in some smart camera tricks to make that easier. Both devices have a single, fixed camera at the top, but the camera will zoom in and follow you around, so that you dont have to hold a phone up to your face while youre chatting. That way, you can move throughout a room and remain engaged on a call. But the story of this product isnt just what it can and cant do — its whether people will be willing to bring a Facebook-connected mic and camera into their home at all. Facebook has emphasized the privacy features built in here (theres an off button that completely deactivates the camera and mics), but that may not be enough to comfort those already skeptical of the company, which has been beset with recent privacy scandals. Both the Portal and Portal Plus are shipping today. Theyll be available from Facebooks website, as well as through Best Buy and Amazon, which will also have the devices in stores. The smaller Portal sells for $199, and the larger Portal Plus goes for $349. At launch, youll be able to get a $100 discount if you buy two at once — which makes some sense, since youll probably want another Portal user to chat with.

So I sent my mom that newfangled Facebook Portal


Who am I going to be worried about? Oh Facebook seeing? No, Im not worried about Facebook seeing. Theyre going to look at my great art collection and say they want to come steal it? No, I never really thought about it. Thats my 72-year-old mother Sally Constines response to whether shes worried about her privacy now that she has a Facebook Portal video chat device. The gadget goes on sale and starts shipping today at $349 for the 15.6-inch swiveling screen Portal+, $199 for the 10-inch Portal, and $100 off for buying any two. The sticking point for most technology reporters — that its creepy or scary to have a Facebook camera and microphone in your house — didnt even register as a concern with a normal tech novice like my mom. I dont really think of it any different from a phone call, she says. Its not a big deal for me. While Facebook has been mired by privacy scandals after a year of Cambridge Analytica and its biggest-ever data breach, the concept that it cant be trusted hasnt necessarily trickled down to everyone. And without that coloring her perception, my mom found the Portal to be an easy way to video chat with family, and a powerful reminder to do so. For a full review of Facebook Portal, check out TechCrunch hardware editor Brian Heaters report: Facebook Portal+ reviewAs a quick primer, Portal and Portal+ are smart video screens and Bluetooth speakers that offer an auto-zooming camera that follows you around the room as you video chat. They include both Facebooks own voice assistant for controlling Messenger, as well as Amazon Alexa. Theres also a third-party app platform for speech-activated Spotify and Pandora, video clips from The Food Network and Newsy, and it can slideshow through your Facebook photos while its idle. For privacy, communications are encrypted, AI voice processing is done locally on the device, theres an off switch that disconnects the camera and mic and it comes with a physical lens cover so you know no ones watching you. It fares well in comparison to the price, specs and privacy features compared to Amazons Echo Show, Google Home Hub and other smart displays. When we look at our multi-functional smartphones and computers, connecting with loved ones isnt always the first thing that comes to mind the way it did with an old-school home telephone. But with the Portal in picture frame mode rotating through our Facebook photos of those loved ones, and with it at the beck and call of our voice commands, it felt natural to turn those in-between times we might have scrolled through Instagram to instead chatting face to face. My mother found setting up the Portal to be quite simple, though she wished the little instructional card used a bigger font. She had no issue logging in to her Facebook, Amazon Alexa and Spotify accounts. Its all those things in one. If you had this, you could put Alexa in a different room, the Constine matriarch says. She found the screen to be remarkably sharp, though some of the on-screen buttons could be better labeled, at least at first. But once she explored the devices software, she was uncontrollably giggling while trying on augmented reality masks as we talked. She even used the AR Storytime feature to read me a bedtime tale like she did 30 years ago. If I was still a child, I think I would have loved this way to play with a parent who was away from home. The intuitive feature instantly had her reading a modernized Three Little Pigs story while illustrations filled our screens. And when she found herself draped in an AR big bad wolf costume during his quotes, she knew to adopt his gruff voice. One of the few problems she found was that when Facebooks commercials for Portal came on the TV, theyd end up accidentally activating her Portal. Facebook might need to train the device to ignore its own ads, perhaps by muting them in a certain part of the audio spectrum as one Reddit user suggested Amazon may have done to prevent causing trouble with its Super Bowl commercial. My mom doesnt Skype or FaceTime much. Shes just so used to a lifetime of audio calls with her sister back in England that she rarely remembers that video is an option. Having a dedicated device in the kitchen kept the idea top-of-mind. I really want to have a conversation seeing her. I think I would really feel close to her if I could see her like Im seeing you now, she tells me. Convincing jaded younger adults to buy a Portal might be a steep challenge for Facebook. But perhaps Facebook understands that. Rather than being seemingly ignorant of or calloused about the privacy climate its launching Portal into, the company may be purposefully conceding to the tech news wonks that includes those wholl be reviewing Portal but not necessarily the much larger mainstream audience. If it concentrates on seniors and families with young children who might not have the same fears of Facebook, it may have found a way to actually bring us closer together in the way its social network is supposed to. Facebook launches Portal auto-zooming video chat screens for $199/$349Comparing Google Home Hub vs Amazon Echo Show 2 vs Facebook Portal