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Apple working on Animoji in FaceTime and tabs for iPad apps, says Bloomberg


Last month we learned that Apple is reportedly focusing on reliability and performance in iOS 12 over new features, and now were starting to hear about more of those features that will arrive in iOS at some point in the future. Bloomberg reports that Apple will bring its Animoji characters to the iPad, thanks to a new model of the tablet that has a Face ID camera. Apple is also planning to bring Animoji to FaceTime, so iOS users can put virtual emoji over their faces like the filters found in Snapchat, Facebook, and Instagram. The new software features are part of a new iOS release codenamed Peace, says Bloomberg. The release will also reportedly include universal apps that work across iPhones, iPads, and Macs. These apps sound similar to Microsofts own work with Windows Universal Apps that run across pcs, tablets, phones, and even devices like the HoloLens headset. iOS 12 is also said to include improvements to the Do Not Disturb feature, and a redesigned built-in stocks app. While Apple is planning some software updates this year, it sounds like the bigger iOS features wont arrive in time for iOS 12. Bloomberg reports that redesigned home screens for the iPhone, iPad, and CarPlay wont arrive in 2018, and that iPad owners will have to wait until 2019 for significant software updates. The iPad will reportedly get tabs within apps so you can run several windows inside a single app, and the ability to run windows from the same app side-by-side. Tabs have typically been used in browsers, but macOS was updated with this feature a couple of years ago and Microsoft is also planning to bring tabs to every Windows 10 app over the course of the next year. Apple is also reportedly holding out on new Apple Pencil features, and a simple toggle in the email app to mute threads. The delays are part of what is being described as an internal culture shift at Apple, allowing engineers to work on new features without having to cram them into a single annual update. Apple Pay Cash and iCloud message sync both missed the iOS 11 update schedule, and Apple has been battling a number of software and security bugs in macOS and iOS 11 recently. If Apple can spread out its feature updates into steady point releases for iOS then this should hopefully allow for more test time and less bugs and crashes.

Appleā€™s Animojis may come to iPad and FaceTime this fall


The company is working on a number of updates for its fall release. Apple's biggest software updates are always scheduled for a single fall release and today Bloomberg reports on some new features that we can look forward to later this year. First up, third-party apps will be able to work across iPhones, iPads and Mac computers -- a feature we've heard talk of before and will involve both iOS 12 and macOS 10.14. Additionally, the iPhone X's Animojis will be getting an upgrade, with new characters and a better menu reportedly on the way as well as the ability to use them in FaceTime. And they won't be relegated to the iPhone X for much longer. Bloomberg says Apple is working on a new iPad that will have the Face ID camera, allowing iPad users to play with Animojis as well. Some other updates include a redesigned Stocks app, more options in the Do Not Disturb setting and changes to the iPad's photo import interface. We can also expect to see Siri become more integrated into the iPhone's search function and a Digital Health tool that will let parents keep track of their children's screen time. Bloomberg reports that while Apple will continue to haul out its major updates during its annual fall release, the company is switching up how it handles updates internally. Rather than having its team focus on the upcoming fall update, Apple will now take a wider view and keep its eye on the next two years' updates. That way, if certain features aren't quite ready, they don't have to be forced out prematurely. Bloomberg's sources say that as Apple has grown, its update strategy has begun to fail, with features launching before they're fully ready, leaving them unreliable and buggy. With this new strategy, Apple hopes that will happen less often.