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Broadcom will relocate to U.S. by April 3 to speed security review of Qualcomm bid


Hoping to avoid a prolonged national security review, Singapore-based Broadcom said it will move its international headquarters back to the U.S. by April 3 as it continues a hostile takeover bid for rival Qualcomm. In a press release today, Broadcom confirmed the date for the first time while also emphasizing its roots in the U.S. Indeed, the whole snarled mess surrounding the notion of a foreign company buying a prize like Qualcomm goes right to the heart of what one means by U.S. company. Politicians are worried by the thought of an Asia-based company seizing control of Qualcomm, which is emerging as a leader in next-generation 5G chips. Qualcomms board has fought the bid since last November even as Broadcom raised the price to $121 billion. Last week, the U.S. Treasurys Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS) released a letter saying it was reviewing the transaction for national security risks, putting the deal temporarily on hold. This was not entirely surprising and was one of the reasons Broadcom announced at a ceremony with President Trump last November that it plans to relocate to the U.S. The company said in its press release today that it supports the CFIUS process and noted that the agency had previously reviewed and cleared its acquisition of Brocade in November 2017. At the close of that transaction, Broadcom agreed to relocate. The move to the U.S. will be a homecoming for a company that in many ways never really left. Broadcom began life in Irvine, California as a fabless semiconductor company. It was acquired in 2016 by Avago Technologies, which started as a product division of Hewlett-Packard and was spun off in 1999 into Agilent Technologies. After that deal, Avago renamed itself Broadcom and established joint headquarters in Singapore and San Jose. In many ways, what Broadcom refers to as a plan to redomicile to the U.S. is a largely symbolic move. The company hasnt said how many executives or what, if any, operations may be shifted. But it emphasized that it believes the change should eliminate any fears around national security. In short, U.S. national security concerns are not a risk to closing, as Broadcom never plans to acquire Qualcomm before it completes redomiciliation, the company said. Whether that does actually satisfy the CFIUS remains to be seen. Meanwhile, amid delays in reaching a deal, rumors have emerged that rival Intel is considering making a bid for Broadcom.

President Trump blocks Broadcom’s proposed Qualcomm acquisition


( Reuters) — U.S. President Donald Trump on Monday blocked microchip maker Broadcoms proposed takeover of Qualcomm on national security grounds, ending what would have been the technology industrys biggest deal ever amid concerns that it would give China the upper hand in mobile communications. The presidential order reflected a calculation that the United States lead in creating technology and setting standards for the next generation of mobile cell phone communications would be lost to China if Singapore-based Broadcom took over San Diego-based Qualcomm, according to a White House official. Qualcomm has emerged as one of the biggest competitors to Chinas Huawei Technologies Co [HWT.UL] in the sector, making Qualcomm a prized asset. Qualcomm had earlier rebuffed Broadcoms $117 billion bid, which was under investigation by the U.S. Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS), a multi-agency panel led by the Treasury Department that reviews the national security implications of acquisitions of U.S. corporations by foreign companies. In a letter on March 5, CFIUS said it was investigating whether Broadcom would starve Qualcomm of research dollars that would allow it to compete and also cited the risk of Broadcoms relationship withthird party foreign entities. While it did not identify those entities, the letter repeatedly described Qualcomm as the leading company in so-called 5G technology development and standard setting. A shift to Chinese dominance in 5G would have substantial negative national security consequences for the United States, CFIUS said. While the United States remains dominant in the standards-setting space currently, China would likely compete robustly to fill any void left by Qualcomm as a result of this hostile takeover. A White House official on Monday confirmed that the national security concerns related to the risks of Broadcoms relationship with third party foreign entities. A source familiar with CFIUS thinking had said that, if the deal was completed, the U.S. military was concerned that within 10 years,there would essentially be a dominant player in all of these technologies and thats essentially Huawei, and then the American carriers would have no choice. They would just have to buy Huawei (equipment).Huawei has been forging closer commercial ties with big telecom operators across Europe and Asia, putting it in prime position to lead the global race for 5G networks despite U.S. concerns. Huawei has a dominant position in China, which is set to become the worlds biggest 5G market by far, and has also made inroads in the rest of world to compete with rivals such as Ericsson (ERICb.ST) and Nokia (NOKIA.HE) in several lucrative markets, including countries that are longstanding U.S. allies. Qualcomm is also a major player in 5G, estimated to have 15 percent of 5G-essential patents in the world, compared with 11 percent for Nokia and 10 percent for all of China, according to a Jefferies report citing LexInnova research. Many smartphone makers are counting on Qualcomm to deliver its 5G chipset on time in late 2018 to roll out their 5G phones in 2019. Shares of Broadcom rose less than 1.0 percent to $264.10 in after-hours trade while Qualcomm fell 4.3 percent to $60.14. Broadcom said it was reviewing the presidential order. Broadcom strongly disagrees that its proposed acquisition of Qualcomm raises any national security concerns, it said in a statement in response to the decision. Qualcomm, which had delayed its annual shareholder meeting during the CFIUS review, set the new date for March 23. The move by Trump to kill the deal comes only months after the U.S. president himself stood next to Broadcom Chief Executive Hock Tan at the White House, announcing the companys decision to move its headquarters to the United States and calling itone of the really great, great companies. This is the fifth time a U.S. president has blocked a deal based on CFIUS objections and the second deal Trump has stopped since assuming office slightly over a year ago. The proposed takeover of Qualcomm by the Purchaser (Broadcom) is prohibited, and any substantially equivalent merger, acquisition, or takeover, whether effected directly or indirectly, is also prohibited, the presidential order released on Monday said. The order citedcredible evidence that led Trump to believe that Broadcoms taking control of Qualcommmight take action that threatens to impair the national security of the United States. Broadcom had struggled to complete its proposed deal to buy Qualcomm, which had cited several concerns including the price offered and potential antitrust hurdles. The presidential decision to block the deal cannot be appealed. However, it is not clear what rules Broadcom would have to follow if it goes ahead with announced plans to move its headquarters to the United States. Companies may challenge CFIUSs jurisdiction in court but may not challenge the inter-agency panels national security findings, a CFIUS expert said. If Broadcom decides to press on with its effort to buy Qualcomm, it would be wise to drop the matter for now while the company quietly wraps up its move to the United States, a second CFIUS expert said. Once the move is done, Broadcom could argue that CFIUS does not have jurisdiction, the second expert said. Both spoke privately to protect business relationships.