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Apple memo warning employees about leaking gets leaked


Apple warns leakers that theyre getting caught faster than ever. On Friday, Bloomberg News published what it described as an "internal blog" post in full. The memo warned that Apple "employees, contractors, or suppliers—do get caught, and theyre getting caught faster than ever." The post also reportedly noted that, "in some cases," leakers "face jail time and massive fines for network intrusion and theft of trade secrets both classified as federal crimes," adding that, in 2017, "Apple caught 29 leakers, and of those, 12 were arrested. " It is not clear what precise charges those arrested face. Leaks are nothing new for Apple or any other Silicon Valley firm, but they have been particularly abundant at Apple of late.  As recently as February 2018, Apple's iBoot code was posted to GitHub. Last September, iPhone X specs were also leaked. In June 2012, an AT&T executive admitted to leaking Apple-related information to investors. Many leaks, like news about Apple working on its own processors and developing a way to make macOS and iOS software interoperable, have appeared in Bloomberg, which published this leak as well. "You've got thousands of people working on manufacturing something who have no vested interest in keeping it secret," one employee said, adding that he believes leaks will continue to increase as Apple ramps up overseas manufacturing operations. "It will be increasingly hard to hide the industrial design we do because we manufacture things overseas. Since we don't do it in the US, it may be hard to surprise people over anything in the future." Way back in 2006, Ars reported on a California state appellate court decision that found in favor of Apple-leaking sites—the company could not force them to reveal their sources, citing Californias journalist shield law. Apple did not immediately respond to Ars' request for comment. The US Attorney's Office for the Northern District of California did not immediately respond to Ars' request for comment either. "I have reached out to our high-tech crimes unit for additional information, and I will be happy to relay that to you upon receipt," Terry Lynn Harman, an assistant district attorney in Santa Clara County (where Apple is based), emailed Ars.

Leaked Apple memo reveals 12 people were arrested for leaking last year


The company found a total of 29 people who leaked private info. Bloomberg got its hands on a leaked Apple memo today regarding, funnily enough, leaks. The company is well-known for liking to keep things under wraps, but its leadership isn't pleased with how often Apple employees are leaking information to the press. According to the memo, Apple caught 29 individuals -- employees, contractors and supply chain partners -- who leaked information last year and 12 of them were arrested. " Leakers do not simply lose their jobs at Apple. In some cases, they face jail time and massive fines for network intrusion and theft of trade secrets both classified as federal crimes," it reads. Apple's memo, posted to an internal blog, warns company employees about getting too cozy with journalists and bloggers. " While it may seem flattering to be approached, it's important to remember that you're getting played," said Apple. "The success of these outsiders is measured by obtaining Apple's secrets from you and making them public." It adds that in these situations, Apple staffers have "everything to lose" if they give in. This isn't the first time that Apple has tried to discourage leaking. Last year, it held a briefing (which was also leaked) wherein company leaders explained to around 100 employees that leaks originating from Apple's campus were more common than supply chain leaks in 2016. And though we obviously don't hear about every firing resulting from unauthorized sharing of company information, the firing of the employee whose daughter leaked the iPhone X was pretty public. "The impact of a leak goes far beyond the people who work on a project," Apple argues. "Leaking Apple's work undermines everyone at Apple and the years they've invested in creating Apple products." The memo ends on a note from executive Greg Joswiak. "Everyone comes to Apple to do the best work of their lives -- work that matters and contributes to what all 135,000 people in this company are doing together," he said. "The best way to honor those contributions is by not leaking."